Big Gigantic and the Onesie Party

Big Gigantic and the Onesie Party

Halloween weekend started off with a rager of a show at The Tabernacle featuring Big Gigantic with Big Wild and Louis Futon. It was a costume party and people showed up dressed as everything from ketchup and mustard to kittens, with a particular focus on onesies. The “ATL Onesie Party” was the name given to the night by Big Gigantic on their Twitter. At the end of the show the band took a photo with the entire Tabby audience, the duo themselves had been sporting their onesies through their whole set. 

Their two night stop in Atlanta was part of their Brighter Future Tour to promote their newest album by the same name. According to their site, the newest album is a sort of call to action. A response to the rising levels of turmoil in the world, it is a call to “come together and work towards a Brighter Future for us.” The album features a powerful ensemble of artists including Waka Flocka Flame, Griz and Natalie Cressman among others and is a vocal album, which is a first for the liveelectronic duo. 

The venue was packed out with people in costume. All ages weaved through the crowd to jostle one another as they bounced to the increasingly intense bass. Louis Futon, a young and talented DJ from Philly started off the night with a relatively chill set. Heavy hip-hop influences combined with some easy listening and ending with a banging bass set the audience up nicely for the dance crazy music of Big Wild. Remixes of popular rap songs and a nicely choreographed light show had the crowd riveted to the stage and the constant rise and drop of the bass kept them jumping wildly. 

By the time Big Gigantic took the stage The Tabernacle was completely full to the highest balcony and everyone was ready to ride the music as high as it would carry them. The duo did not so much play with the crowd as they did just rock out all night. A soulful sax on stage is something that simply cannot be replaced by any other instrument or effect. Live electronic is easily some of my favorite music. The vibrations I feel from instrumental solos is just not the same as the condensed form of an electronic effect. Every solo brought the house down. By the end of the night there was no swaying or bobbing or even jumping to the music. There was only raging. The kind of thrashing that happens when every bass line rearranges your internal organs and every sax solo makes your mind soar. There is no caring about what the people around you might think of how ungracefully you’re moving, there is no worry about tomorrow. There is only tonight. There is only the catharsis of shaking your body until your head spins. 

In addition to playing an incredible show complete with a cover of Michael Jackson’s "Thriller" and one of the trippiest light displays I’ve ever seen, the guys also volunteered with the Atlanta Community Food Bank before their second concert Saturday night. Walking the walk never sounded so good.  

A portion of each ticket sold during this tour will go to a local charity in each city. 

Photos by Ryan Purcell for Bullet Music

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