Flosstradamus Brings Back the Bass to ATL

Flosstradamus Brings Back the Bass to ATL

I thought I was done with dubstep and trap – I had virtually given up on the idea of me going to one of those shows and really enjoying myself sober, but Flosstradamus delivered an epic set that reignited my love for bass. 

It was below 40 degrees outside, but everyone in line was too hyped up to care. Outside a girl was yelling at her friend on the phone, “How the fuck did you get inside? Our tickets were for the wrong show, Sarah!” Floss had sold out and everyone and their mother was trying to find a way in. When I entered the Tabernacle around 9:45 p.m., it was buzzing with energy. Doors opened at 8:00 p.m., and the venue was packed with people ready to headbang and get down.

TOWKIO amped up the crowd with popular hip-hop tracks and an infectious enthusiasm that made me want to move. He finished his set at 10:15 p.m., and 15 minutes later SLUSHII came out yelling “Somebody scream!!!” I couldn’t help it, the techno snob in me abandoned ship and my hips began doing that thing they do when one is uncontrollably feeling the bass. It should be noted that I’m 5’2 and generally a tiny person, so when I heard SLUSHII yell “EDM MOSH PIT,” I turned around to my friend and said, “Ok, time to go upstairs.” 

From the second floor balcony, I could really see how packed the show was. The big monitor displayed bright visuals of ice cream monsters and quirky little characters that matched SLUSHII’s vibrant set and personality. Then out of nowhere security pulled a kid over the barricade and he ran on stage - it turns out Chandler Riggs from The Walking Dead is a headbanger! SLUSHII played lots of heavy bass tracks and hip hop, but he also delivered some classic jams like the Pokemon theme song and “Wonderwall.” He closed his set around 11:40 p.m. and left the crowd amped up for Flosstradamus.

Right before midnight, crew came out to set the stage up and revealed a sick-ass set up. The stage had a structure that looked like a post-apocalyptic building with a ladder to get upstairs. The stage was set up so the DJs would be dropping beats from up high. There was a missile on one side and a satellite on the other. The stage flashed a massive yellow triangle with an exclamation point on it, their iconic symbol, and a robotic voice announced their arrival, asking Atlanta if we was "ready for the revolution". The duo came out in what looked like bullet-proof vests and camo pants chanting “ATL HOE, ATL HOE” and everything about their vibe felt aggressive and high energy. J2K waved around a huge Floss flag and Autobot climbed up the ladder making his way up to the CDJs.

From beginning to end, they worked the crowd with great tracks that flowed perfectly and a lot of crowd involvement. While Autobot went ham on the boards, J2K jumped around the stage rapping and telling the HDY NATION to start a mosh pit. Around 12:45 a.m. they stopped everything and announced the arrival of a special guest. Travis Porter came on stage and began chanting “My ladies run this shit,” and then Juvenile’s fire anthem “Back That Azz Up” started playing. The crowd went wild. The music felt fun and dirty without seeming cheesy or forced.

They fired t-shirts into the crowd with the robotic missile and even did the Mannequin Challenge. Then J2K stopped everything and instructed the crowd to split into two sides leaving a huge gap in between and created one of the biggest mosh pits I’ve ever seen at the Tabby. They closed their set around 1:30 a.m. with the crowd chanting “One More Song!” 

The venue got dark, and then bright red lights started flashing, “Hard in Da Paint” started playing and Waka Flocka Flame ran on stage. How’s that for an encore? He dominated the stage, rapping and dancing and even jumped over the barricade and walked through the crowd greeting and high-fiving fans, reminding us why he’s such a cool guy. The show ended about ten minutes later and Flosstradamus finished the night with an important message: “There’s so much going on in the world, but we’re all about the peace.” By the end of the night, my faith in trap and dubstep had been restored, and I had remembered why I love that "ATL HOE" chant so much.

Photos by Sarah Htun for Bullet Music

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